Crisis Communication

Case Study: Domino’s YouTube Video

Posted on: April 25, 2009

After Dominos employees made a video of them tampering with food, it was posted on YouTube. Before the video was removed, it had received almost one million views.

Although the employees claim none of the food they tampered with was served, the video and media coverage caused damage to the company. The president of the company posted a YouTube response:

In the video, he reassures customers and tells people exactly what is being done to make things better. There also is a very active Twitter account, linked to the YouTube page of the video, which was used to respond to customer’s concerns.

Due to social media, corporate responses need to be immediate. According to AdAge, it took the company about 48 hours to be fully responsive. The company’s first strategy seemed to be “wait and see,” with hopes it would blow over.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the president of Levick Strategic Communications, Richard Levick, “gives an F to Domino‚Äôs response for the first 24 hours, but an A for everything after.”

In AdAge, Levick suggested companies do several things to prepare for a crisis; (1) Identify who you need during a crisis, from PR to HR, (2) Be prepated for worst-case scenarios, (3) Own SEO keywords you may need in a crisis, (4) Be connected online, (5) Respond as soon as possible.

I’m not sure if it was a strategic move or not, but I’ve realized a lot of the negative coverage has been replaced with news releases and stories about Domino’s new pasta bowls. But, Time suggested they take a “commercial break” to let things cool down.

What I think

The biggest mistake Domino’s made was that they waited to respond. I also wonder if they had a crisis plan in place for a situation such as this. Food tampering is a common enough occurence, but it seems that many companies still have not grasped how much social media can affect a crisis situation.

I think the YouTube video response was a good idea. Many people still searched for the video and this was at the top of the results. Having the president of the company respond and tell exactly what the company was doing also was effective.

I agree with Todd Defren that having a social media presence before the crisis would have bought the company more credibility and time. Domino’s started a Twitter account after the video had been aired. Had a Twitter account already been set up, they probably would have been alerted to the video much more quickly and already had followers to respond to.

Domino’s has probably realized that they need to monitor the Web much more closely. It’s actually very simple. I have a Google Alert for my name that is delivered to my Reader daily.

Sources

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